Wednesday, November 26, 2014

The Nile Project Collective: Aswan CD & U.S. Tour Through Spring 2015

From a media release:

Loving Listening, Subtle Flow: The Nile Project Meshes the River’s Many Sounds, Calls for New River-Based Conversation

• Tour begins January 15, 2015 in Gainesville, FLA, including
• March 19, 2015 New York, NY, Rubenstein Atrium - Lincoln Center,
• March 20, 2104 New York, NY, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts - Pace University with LiveSounds
For additional dates, check their website


“Music is a language,” exclaims Ethiopian sax player and Nile Project musician Jorga Mesfin, “and in the Nile Project, the conversation is about love.” The love of craft, of place, of the river that connects eleven countries and millions of people.

The passion and affection spring forth via one of the tightest cross-cultural collaborations in history. Forged over weeks of carefully calibrated workshops and participatory composition, the Nile Project Collective members hail from all along the great river, from its sources beyond Lake Victoria to its delta in Egypt.

They have learned each others’ traditions well enough to create substantive music together, work that goes far deeper than mere meet-and-greet jam sessions. An ensemble of a dozen musicians will tour the US in January-May 2015.

To craft this music, Egyptian and Ethiopian artists have mastered each others’ wildly different modal systems. A Burundian bassist has become the foundation within head-spinning Ugandan rhythms. Instruments that parted ways millennia before are reunited and pushed into new tunings, new places. Love songs and lullabies have crossed geography and language barriers to forge new songs and new, close friendships.

Creating together, with the role of lead and soloist rotating among the players, the Collective has crafted emotionally stirring, musically complex pieces that weave together over the course of a concert into one long and shifting composition. This work serves as a rallying point to draw more and more people from more and more places into a meaningful conversation, where love and art intertwine with politics, history, ecology, and commerce.

Yet it all starts with sound, and with listening. “In the end, it is all about learning to listen,” reflects Egyptian singer and Nile Project musician Dina El Wedidi. “I think that is what we all took away from this, whether it is the participants or the audience. Listening is the basis for understanding.”



The Nile Project 2015 US Touring Ensemble

Mohamed Abo Zekry:
Despite his tender years, this oud player has a stunning command of his instrument, as well as an open ear for other forms, skills that got him a recent album deal with Harmonia Mundi.

Alsarah: Based in Brooklyn, this soulful Sudanese singer and ethnomusicologist’s songs have won high praise from roots-music tastemakers like Songlines Magazine.

Michael Bazibu: A member of Uganda’s leading traditional music and dance company, Ndere, for the past 17 years, Bazibu plays several traditional Ugandan stringed and percussion instruments with virtuosic grace.

Hani Bedair: When the biggest stars in the Middle East need daff (hand drum) or riq (traditional tambourine), they call Bedair, whose percussion skills have also earned him a teaching position at several respected Cairo institutions.

Nader El Shaer: Born in the culturally rich town of Port Said, Egypt, El Shaer taught himself accordion and ney, only to fall in love with the tones of the kawala (end-blown cane flute) and its role in Arabic classical music.

Dina El Wedidi: With experience that spans Arabic classical music, edgy theater, and street protest, this young singer has most recently worked with Brazilian heavyweight Gilbert Gil on her debut album.

Meklit Hadero (select appearances only): Co-founder of the Nile Project, this American-based Ethiopian singer frequently digs deep into soul and hip hop, but never loses sight of her roots.

Jorga Mesfin: This self-taught sax player meshes jazz with Ethiopia’s wealth of musical forms and ideas, both as a respected band leader and favorite sideman for greats like Mulatu Astatke.

Kasiva Mutua: Kenyan percussionist and singer Mutua may have learned drumming from her grandmother, but has developed her own knack for powerful Afropop beats. Her expressive playing can tell a story on its own, or keep a band perfectly in the pocket.

Sophie Nzayisenga: The first female master of the Rwandan traditional zither (inanga), Nzayisenga learned at her internationally acclaimed father’s knee before setting out to make the instrument her own.

Dawit Seyoum: Known for his flexibility, Seyoum rocks both the krar and the bass krar, the six-string powerhouse harps at the heart of much of Ethiopia’s music.

Steven Sogo: Burundi’s leading bassist, this multilingual multi-instrumentalist can play anything with strings, including the umiduri, Burundi’s answer to the birembau. Add to that Sogo’s wonderful voice, and it’s easy to see why he was named a World Bank musical ambassador.

Selamnesh Zemane: Hailing from a long line of unique culture bearers in Northern Ethiopia, this young singer has brought her traditions to collaborations with indie darlings like Debo Band and The Ex.

The ensemble flows from a larger collective of musicians—most of whom are young and work across genres—that in turn arose from a long, thoughtful recruitment and collaboration process. The Nile Project strived to include musicians from many different cultural communities along the Nile, while finding a compelling combination of instruments and voice to support and balance one another.

Over the course of two gatherings and a major, five-country African tour, the collective has gained an increasing sense of how to craft joint works, guided by their own interests and by the Collective’s leaders: Nile Project Musical Director Miles Jay, a contrabassist and composer who spent much of the last decade living and working with prominent artists across the Middle East and Africa; and Nile Project executive director Mina Girgis, an Egyptian ethnomusicologist and curator who specializes in creating innovative musical experiences. The exchange of know-how has had significant impact on the participants—bassist Steven Sogo enthuses about his newfound love for Ethiopian modes—and has molded a sound as broad and powerful as the Nile itself.

“The set is a continuous flow, like the river,” explains Jay. “We craft creative transitions from one piece to the next, inspired by the Nile’s soundscapes. So, we end a song and the percussionist continues the pulse, even through the applause. Or all the strings at the end of the song go into a drone, and then we introduce a melody to modulate to the next key.”

Evoking the Nile is not enough, however. Many trans-national music projects stop at the stage, when top performers break out their best for an audience. For The Nile Project, live performance is merely one stop on a long, compelling journey. “Music is the gateway that lets us envision the Nile Basin, its people, its challenges,” explains Girgis. “Yet the concert experience is just the beginning.”

The Nile Project uses music to spark cultural curiosity and engage audiences—particularly university and student audiences—encouraging them to feel connected to the river and to explore new approaches to its large-scale problems. In an evolving series of interlocking programs that spring from the musical experience, the project aims to inspire, educate and empower young people worldwide to become Nile Citizens. These growing circles of participants will contribute to Nile sustainability through their music, leadership, and innovative ideas.

For this reason, nearly every stop on the U.S. tour will be accompanied by a series of workshops and symposia involving the Nile Project participant musicians, complemented by the faculty resources and student interest of each campus. From water issues to women’s roles, from musical discovery to the image of the Nile through history, a wide range of topics tackle the river’s complexity and aim to draw students into active roles. These activities expand the circle of conversation begun by the musicians, to encompass entire academic communities.

The exchange on stage and the long interweaving of voices and ideas that preceded it, however, sets the tone for other interactions, dedicated to matters beyond music. “No matter what topic we’re addressing, the music shows something that we can aspire to,” notes Nile Project Musical Director Miles Jay. “It shows it in subtle terms.”

Select Nile Project Workshop Topics

The Nile Project will offer a variety of workshop themes during its 2015 US Tour, including those below. These programs will serve as catalysts for longer-term engagement with students and faculty beyond the tour ensemble’s musical performances.

1. Musical Collaboration & Water Cooperation
2. Imagining the Nile
3. The Nile & African Identity
4. Civic Engagement and Water Resource Management
5. School Matinee: K-12 student outreach
6. The Role of Musicians in Social Movements
7. Women of the Nile: An Untapped Resource
8. Finding Opportunities in Challenges: Crowdsourcing Solutions for an Environmentally Sustainable Nile Basin
9. Music Master Classes

Single Release: Alice Sungurov - "Broke My Heart" (HitPlay Records - Oct 1, 2014)

Single Release: Alice Sungurov - "Broke My Heart"
(HitPlay Records - Oct 1, 2014)

Check out all her music


The latest single from New York based singer/songwriter Alice Sungurov is called Broke My Heart, a pop song with a nice rhythmic complexity and some tasty melodic changes to complement her strong voice - strong and sweet at the same time. The chorus rocks out and the track lights up with an impressive drummer who switches convincingly from rock bombast to thoughtful intricacy on the bridges.

My beef with most contemporary pop - my most common beef - is that they take a great voice and add cheesy technology instead of real music to back it up. That's not the case here, and although Alice is just 16 and a sophomore at high school, hers is a voice she's come to honestly, as the saying goes. Alice was diagnosed at age four with Auditory Processing Disorder. Her mother founded a specialized arts school for children using creativity to enhance learning and life skills. Alice flourished and became involved in the arts and music from a very young age.



She garnered the interest of HitPlay Records and her work is being internationally released by them using Red Music, A Subsidiary of Sony Music. So Blind, the first single for the label released earlier this year, is an upbeat pop tune that takes full advantage of her agile voice .

The lyrics are clever - not designed to be deep but enough to pique the ear all the same. Musically, I'd say the same; it avoids predictability in an era of sameness. The track was produced by label owner and president Phil Garland.

Born in Jersey, now based in NYC (where else?) she's pursuing her career while serving as class president at her high school.

Websites:
http://www.alicesungurov.com/
https://www.facebook.com/AliceSungurov
@sungurovalice

Glenfiddich Issues Call for Canadian Artists to Enter Competition for the Coveted 2015 Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize

From a media release:

Glenfiddich
Issues Call for Canadian Artists to Enter Competition for the Coveted
2015 Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize

• To apply and for more information, applicants are asked to visit www.glenfiddich.com/ca/artistsinresidence


Toronto, November 26, 2014 –
Glenfiddich is issuing a “Call to Artists” currently living and creating art in Canada to enter the internationally renowned competition for the prestigious 2015 Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize. The Canadian “Call to Artists” opens today, Wednesday November 26, 2014 and closes midnight eastern time, Friday January 30, 2015.

The Canadian winner will be one of a small and distinguished group around the world to be awarded the art community’s coveted prize to live and work at the Glenfiddich Distillery in Dufftown, Scotland. It’s only fitting that the world’s most awarded single malt Scotch whisky honours distinction. The three-month residency valued at $20,000 per artist represents the Glenfiddich commitment to the pioneering spirit of the arts and the communities it serves. While living in crofts (traditional small Scottish farm houses), artists are encouraged to find inspiration from the unique setting in the Scottish Highlands. The experience provides an opportunity unlike any other for artists to work in an international community, share in a dialogue with other artists and foster cross-disciplinary ideas.

Now in its 14th year internationally and 10th in Canada, the Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize attracts close to 200 submissions across Canada from the visual arts. The prize covers the cost of travel, living expenses and materials throughout the residency. From the submissions, five jury members choose eight finalists and ultimately one winner. To apply and for more information, applicants are asked to visit www.glenfiddich.com/ca/artistsinresidence

The distinguished jury for the selection of the Canadian Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize includes, Dr. Sara Diamond, president of OCAD University, Gaetane Verna, director of The Power Plant, Adelina Vlas, associate curator of contemporary art at the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), Julian Sleath, programming manager of special events, economic development & culture at the City of Toronto, and the Canadian 2008 Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize recipient, Dave Dyment.

Andy Fairgrieve, curator, Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize underscores that, “The program’s ethos is about encouraging people to take inspiration from their experience living at the distillery, whether that be the pioneering heritage of Glenfiddich, the surrounding environment, or the daily life of the distillery and local community, and to be as pioneering as possible – a mission our artists live and breathe during their three-month residency.”

The Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize has sponsored over 100 artists globally since its inception in 2002. The artistic team of Rhonda Weppler and Trevor Mahovsky, were awarded the 2014 Canadian Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize for their collaborative work that takes an innovative sculptural approach to still life. During the three-month residency the collaborative team ran a community sculpting and casting workshop based around coinage, while producing photography, video, and a range of sculptures made from copper, foil and custom oak veneer.

The past Canadian Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize winners include: Rhonda Weppler and Trevor Mahovsky (2014), Daniel Barrow (2013), Jillian McDonald (2012), Helen Cho (2011), Damian Moppett (2010), Arabella Campbell (2009), Dave Dyment (2008), Jonathon Kaiser (2007), Annie Pootoogook (2006) and Myfanwy Macleod (2005).



2014 Global Artists in Residence Prize recipients from left to right: Rhonda Weppler, Canada; Tania Candaini, Mexico; Hugh Hayden, United States; Hu Zi, China; Chetnaa Verma, India; Trevor Mahovsky, Canada; Han Wonsuk, Korea; Isadora Correa, Chile; Suso 33, Spain; Joyce Ho, Taiwan

Listen & Shop: New Single from 1700 Monkey Ninjas & Ed Purchla Online Shop


Listen & Shop:
New Single from 1700 Monkey Ninjas &
Ed Purchla Online Shop

Check out the single
Check out the clothes


If you'd like some eye popping designs to go with your techno, then we've got you covered in this one post.

The song is amarrikuh (flaccid penises & assault rifles) a not-so-subtle attack on America's gun culture. It cleverly mixes spoken word snippets with an array of noise effects. It's quite effective at getting the message across with superlative editing especially at the end to reinforce the idea.

He manages to mix a little political satire into a heavy message... and you can dance to it too.

On the sartorial side, you can now get your basic leggings and skirts with Ed Purchla's (aka 1700MN alter ego) arresting graphic designs at his online store. He's also a digital abstract artist and you will certainly never go unnoticed in one of his pieces - perfect for clubbing or just making your mark in the everyday world.

Monday, November 10, 2014

Highlights from the African Diaspora International Film Festival New York City November 28 to December 14 2014

From a media release:

Highlights from the African Diaspora International Film Festival New York City
November 28 to December 14, 2014

Check out all the films
Get Tickets


Various locations in Manhattan, NYC including  The Thalia Cinema at Symphony Space, Quad Cinema, The Cowin Center and Chapel at Teachers College, Columbia University and the Riverside Theater.

NEW YORK CITY - The African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF) is proud of its 22-year history of firsts in presenting, interpreting and educating about films from throughout the world that depict the lives of people from Africa and the African Diaspora. The festival features world and US premieres, recent popular titles, classic movies, foreign and independent releases. Post-screening question-and-answer sessions and panel discussions that include filmmakers, critics, academics, and audiences present the most current discourse on filmmaking in Africa and the African Diaspora.

The festival begins every year on the last Friday of the month of November during the Thanksgiving weekend and runs for eighteen days. ADIFF 22nd anniversary will be celebrated from Friday, November 28 through Sunday, December 14, 2014.

Highlights:

ADIFF NY 2014 presents: Gloria Rolando - An Afro-Cuban Filmmaker

Gloria Rolando was born in Cuba  where she developed a career in making films about the Afro-Cuban experience. Her films span across 35 years at the ICAIC, the Cuban national film institute.

Gloria Rolando is currently on a national tour in the USA and is getting great acclaim for her work everywhere. Gloria will be in NY for ADIFF from NOV. 28 to NOV. 30 to present 5 of her films films as part of ADIFF's special program BLACKS IN LATIN AMERICA sponsored by the Academy of Motion Picture.

Come join us Nov. 28 to Nov. 30 and meet this exceptional filmmaker!
Films to screen in New York are:
Her classic Oggun: An Eternal Presence (Oggun: Presencia Eternal)
Her trilogy: 1912, Breaking the Silence: Part 1, 2 & 3  (1912: Voces para un Silencio)
Her most recent work: Reshipment (Re-embarque)

SCREENINGS
1912, Breaking the Silence: Part 1, 2 & 3 (1912: Voces para un Siliencio)
NY Premiere
Part 1: Chap 1 & 2: Sat, Nov. 29 @ 6PM - The Chapel
Part 2: Chap 3 + Q&A: Sat, Nov 29 @ 8PM - The Chapel


1912, Breaking the Silence is a project dedicated to the history of the Party of the Independents of Color (PIC), a political party established in Cuba in 1908 to represents the interest of  Afro-Cubans.

This three parts documentary seeks to cover some antecedents in the history of Afro-Cubans' struggle for self-determination, a necessary recapitulation which goes step by step down the path of resistance taken by the Black movement in Cuba since colonial times, the struggle for independence and the situation of Black Cubans once the island of Cuba achieved its independence in 1902. References are made to significant, Black leaders in Cuba from the nineteenth century, such as Juan Gualberto Gomez and Martin Morua Delgado, Antonio Maceo and Quintin Banderas.

Through the voices, opinions, and commentaries of historians and Cuban cultural icons accompanied by images of documents, photos, and clippings from the press of that era, two main issues are explored : 1) what did the Afro-Cubans do before the founding of the PIC? 2) Was the creation of a political party to represents Afro-Cubans necessary?

Directed by Gloria V. Rolando Casamayor, 45, 58, 56 minutes, Cuba, documentary, Spanish with English subt.
1912: Breaking the Silence, Chapter 1



Oggun: An Eternal Presence  (Oggun: Presencia Eterna) + Q&A
Fri, Nov. 28 @ 4PM - The Chapel


Gloria Rolando relates the patakin or mythical story of Oggun, the tireless warrior who, enamored of his mother, decided as punishment to imprison himself in the mountains. Only Ochun, goddess of love, succeeded in captivating him when she let fall a few drops of honey on the lips of the god of metal, war, progress, and civilization. Oggun is the first effort of the team later to be known as Images of the Caribbean, now chartered as an independent video group. Directed by Gloria Rolando, 1992, Cuba, Documentary, Spanish, 52 min, Spanish, English subtitles

Reshipment (Re-embarque) + Q&A and cocktail after the screening
NY Premiere
AN EVENING WITH GLORIA ROLANDO
Sun, Nov. 30 @ 6M - The Chapel


This is a documentary on Haitians immigrants in Cuba who were sent back in the beginning of the last century when the sugar market crashed and they became unwanted. Directed by Gloria Rolando, 2014, Cuba/Haiti, Documentary, 58 min, Spanish, English subt.

Abayomi Interviews AfroCubana Filmmaker Gloria Rolando



Bound: Africans vs. African-AmericansNY PREMIERE
Fri, Dec. 12 @ 7PM - The Chapel
GALA SCREENING


African vs African Americans is a hard-hitting documentary that addresses the little known tension that exists between Africans and African Americans. The film opens with personal testimonials that expose this rift then walks us through the corridors of African colonialism and African American enslavement, laying bare their effects and how these have divided and bound Africans and African Americans.

Directed by Peres Owino, 2014, 90 min., United States, documentary, English.
Conversation with director Peres Owino & Catered Reception



ADIFF NY 2014 CENTERPIECE
Between Friends
NY Premiere


Launching of the SOUTH AFRICA: 20 YEARS OF DEMOCRACY program presented in collaboration with the South African Department of Arts and Culture, the NFVF and the Kwazulu-Natal Film Commission.

VIP RECEPTION: Tue, Dec. 2  @ 6PM - Riverside Theater
CENTERPIECE SCREENING: Tue, Dec. 2  @ 7:30PM - Riverside Theater

Keynote speaker: Dr. Molefi Kete Asante
Professor in the Department of African American Studies at Temple University, founder of the PhD program in African-American Studies, and President of the Molefi Kete Asante Institute for Afrocentric Studies.

Between Friends
After 7 years, college friends reunite at an up-market game lodge in South Africa. Long buried secrets shared by old friends are eventually exposed, causing tensions to arise in current relationships. A stylish, funny tale of the new South Africa. Stars Thapelo Mokoena, Lihle Dhlomo, Mandisa Nduna, Dunisani Mbebe, Amanda Du Pont, Siyabonga Twala and Morne Du toit.

Directed by Zuko Nodada, 2014, 93 min, South Africa, Romantic comedy, English, Zulu with English subt.
Q&A after the screening.

ADIFF 2014 OPENING NIGHT:
Friday, November 28, 2014
SUPREMACY
7:30PM @ Symphony Space


Joe Anderson (Across the Universe) and Danny Glover star in Supremacy, a racially charged psychological thriller. Supremacy follows a high-ranking white supremacist (Anderson) who murders a cop and hides out with his accomplice by taking a black family hostage. Glover plays the patriarch of the house, an ex-con who must rely on his wits and understanding of the supremacist’s racist mind to keep his family safe.

Supremacy, which made its world premiere in June 2014 at the LA Film Festival, also stars Dawn Olivieri, Derek Luke, Evan Ross, Lela Rochon, Robin Bobeau, and Anson Mount. Based on real events, Supremacy is a shocking, complex, real-life horror story.

(Deadline.com) (USA, 2014, 97 min, Deon Taylor, dir., Drama)

Choral Evensong with the Riverside Choir feat.Laudes Organi by Zoltán Kodály November 23, 2014 in New York City

From a media release:

CHORAL EVENSONG
with The Riverside Choir
Featured music: Laudes Organi by Zoltán Kodály
November 23, 2014 at 5pm
In the Nave of the Riverside Church
Harlem, New York City

• The concert is free to attend, however free-will offerings benefitting the Riverside Food Pantry will be collected.
• For more information, call 212-870-6722 or email music@theriversidechurchny.org.

NEW YORK CITY -
Sacred music and text will fill the soaring halls of The Riverside Church during its Choral Evensong celebration, an evening service of music and song.  Laudes Organi by Zoltán Kodály will be featured by The Riverside Choir on Sunday, November 23, 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. in the Church’s Nave, 490 Riverside Drive (bet. 120th & 122nd Sts.), Morningside Heights.

In honor of the great traditions of the Riverside Church music program, an evening service of music and word — once a weekly occurrence in the life of the Church’s diverse community of faith — will be shared. The Evensong celebration will have a decidedly “Riverside” flavor, with canticles and spirituals sung by The Riverside Choir and soloists, and evening hymns for all to sing.

ABOUT THE MUSIC
Laudes Organi (subtitled Fantasia on a XIIth Century Sequence for Mixed Chorus and Organ) by Zoltán Kodály was commissioned by the Atlanta Chapter for the 1966 National Convention of the American Guild of Organists.  Kodály’s last published work, this piece is a celebration of the organ (its title translates from Latin to “In praise of the organ”) and is based on a fragment of text found in a 12th century manuscript at Switzerland’s Engelberg Abbey.  The programmatic setting of the text references both medieval musical styles and Hungarian chromaticism. The work also pays homage to Guido d’Arezzo, the 11th-century Italian monk credited with the invention of modern musical notation.

ABOUT THE COMPOSER
Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967)

Like his countryman and lifelong friend Béla Bartók, Kodály became interested in the folk music of his Hungarian homeland at an early age and traveled to remote villages of Hungary to record songs on phonograph cylinders in his teens and twenties.  Kodály began his university education in modern languages at the University of Sciences in Budapest, but later enrolled at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music to pursue studies in composition.  After earning his PhD in 1906 with a thesis entitled “The Strophic Structure of Hungarian Folk Songs”, Kodály continued his musical education in Paris under famed composer and organist Charles Widor.  Shortly thereafter, Kodály was appointed a professor at the Liszt Academy of Music, a post he kept for most of his life.  In addition to his compositional output and contributions to the budding field of ethnomusicology, Kodály authored a set of principles for musical instruction that became known as the “Kodály Method,” much of which is still practiced today.  The composer died in Budapest in 1967 and has remained one of the most significant and influential Hungarian artistic figures of the 20th century.

ABOUT THE RIVERSIDE CHOIR
The Riverside Choir is a semi-professional ensemble of fifty singers, a number of whom volunteer their talent and time. Like the church, The Riverside Choir is inter-denominational, interracial, and international. Many choristers are church members and active in other programs. As the Church’s principal choral group, The Riverside Choir is in session from September through June and participates in all Sunday morning and special worship events, as well as in several concert appearances throughout the season.


PROGRAM: CHORAL EVENSONG
LAUDES ORGANI BY ZOLTÁN KODÁLY
MAGNIFICAT & NUNC DIMITTIS BY HERBERT SUMSION

THE RIVERSIDE CHOIR
CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON, CONDUCTOR
CHRISTOPHER CREAGHAN, ORGAN
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2014
5:00 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
THE RIVERSIDE CHURCH, NAVE

Directions: To get to The Riverside Church by subway take the 1 to 116th St. and walk to 490 Riverside Drive (bet. 120th & 122nd Sts.) two blocks west of Broadway.

Check out the video for Rocky Dawuni's African Thriller

Check out the video for Rocky Dawuni's African Thriller
Find out more about Rocky

Cumbancha and Entertainment Weekly have partnered to bring Rocky Dawuni's "African Thriller" video to life. The timing of the video launch occurred just a few days after the 40th anniversary of the legendary "Rumble in the Jungle" boxing match between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman, and the video draws inspiration from that momentous event. At a time when news about Africa is dominated by the Ebola crisis, "African Thriller" offers a positive message celebrating African strength, unity and indomitable spirit. Follow this link to view the video on Entertainment Weekly.