Saturday, August 1, 2015

Experimental Rock Icon Geen Ween Returns to Toronto October 6 2015 at the Horseshoe


From a media release:

GENE WEEN RETURNS TO TORONTO THIS FALL
Horseshoe Tavern - October 6, 2015

Tickets

Toronto - Toronto Downtown Jazz and The Other Operation present Aaron Freeman as he returns to the Toronto stage on Tuesday, October 6, 2015 at the Horseshoe Tavern, bringing back the eponymous Gene Ween, made famous as one half of the popular band, Ween. Tickets go on sale Friday, July 31, at Ticketpro.ca or by calling 1.888.655.9090 FREE.

For nearly 30 years, Freeman led one of experimental rock's greatest genre-hoppers as Ween tackled everything from funk to country and reggae to Irish ballads. Since disbanding the legendary group in 2012, Freeman has reinvented his career, first, releasing a solo album, Marvelous Clouds, in 2012 and created a new band, Freeman, in 2014.

Backed by a four-piece band with material ranging from Freeman's solo work to pieces from the Ween catalogue, he returns this fall performing a variety of hits for one special night.

Gene Ween
The Horseshoe - 370 Queen Street West
Tuesday, October 6, 2015
Doors - 8:30 p.m.
$22 advance - plus service charges
Tickets available at Ticketpro.ca or by calling 1.888.655.9090 FREE

Image credit: "Flickr - moses namkung - Ween 1" by Moses - Ween 1. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flickr_-_moses_namkung_-_Ween_1.jpg#/media/File:Flickr_-_moses_namkung_-_Ween_1.jpg

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Andy Warhol: Revisited Pop Art Exhibit Lecture Series July 29 to August 27 2015 in Toronto


From a media release:

Andy Warhol: Revisited pop art exhibit launches rotating lecture series 
July 29 to August 27, 2015

Programming to include artistic demonstrations and theoretical discussions with accomplished Canadian artists

Check out the Show

TORONTO, ON – To continue to engage and educate Torontonians and visitors to the city about the works and life of prolific artist Andy Warhol, Revolver Gallery has launched a Rotating Lecture Series at the Andy Warhol: Revisited exhibit.

Beginning on Wednesday July 29, The Rotating Lecture Series will feature demonstrations and discussions from art luminaries and accomplished artists’ onsite in the gallery space, located at 77 Bloor Street West in Toronto. Tickets to the various events range in price from $18 to $23, and are available to purchase online and at the door. (Andy Warhol: Revisited exterior. 77 Bloor St. West. Image by Anthony Cohen.)

Upcoming Rotating Lecture Series events include:

Open Studio – Wednesday, July 29; 8 to 9 p.m.
Presented by Open Studio artist Meggan Winsley, this event will feature a screen printing demonstration and a discussion on the history of the silkscreen medium.

Launched in 1971 by printmakers Richard Sewell and Barbara Hall, Open Studio is a charitable, non-profit, artist-run center dedicated to the production, preservation and promotion of contemporary, original fine art prints.  Today, Open Studio is located at 401 Richmond Street West in a vibrant complex that is home to over 130 arts and community organizations.

Gary Taxali - Thursday, August 6; 8 to 9 p.m.
Accomplished international artist, Gary Taxali will discuss Warhol’s impact on today’s artist and how it has informed his own approach to painting. Explore Warhol through an artistic lens as Taxali discusses the artist through his own paintings in this engaging audio visual presentation. A meet and greet with the artist will follow the lecture.

Born in India and raised in Toronto, Gary Taxali is an internationally acclaimed contemporary artist. His retro stylized art, reminiscent of depression era advertising, typography and packaging in the realm of pop art has garnered many awards (including a 2009 Grammy nomination for album art for Aimee Mann).  His major influences include Andy Warhol, Ray Jonson, The Fleischer Brothers, the Russian Avant-Garde, and 1930s and 1940s packaging design, advertising and typography.

Tavis Coburn - Thursday, August 13; 8 to 9 p.m.
Internationally acclaimed artist, Tavis Coburn will be presenting a selection of his 40s era comic book inspired art, and highlight Warhol’s influence on fine art in the digital disciplines. Meet and greet with the artist will follow the lecture

Toronto-based illustrator Tavis Coburn graduated from California’s Art Center College of Design with a BFA in illustration. Since then he has created numerous works for leading publishing, advertising, and music companies in North America and Europe. His illustrations are influenced by 1940s comic book art, the Russian avant-garde movement, and printed materials from the 1950s and 1960s.

Meraj Dhir – Thursday, August 20; 8 to 9 p.m.
Harvard-trained art historian and art critic for FashCam.com, Meraj Dhir will present a multi-media lecture on Andy Warhol's art and film production within the context of the Pop Art movement. Specifically, Dhir will discuss the importance of Warhol to the history of art and the broader cultural sphere. Dhir will assess Warhol's formation as an illustrator and his use of the fine art medium of painting to mediate themes and motifs from mass media and consumer culture. Dhir will also relate Warhol to other so-called "Pop" artists such as Richard Hamilton, Roy Lichtenstein and more recently Ed Ruscha and Jeff Koons. Through detailed formal and historically sensitive analyses of individual works on view in the exhibition, Dhir will propose the multiple ways we can understand the importance and impact of Warhol to the history of art.

Warren Steele – Thursday, August 27, 8 to 9 p.m.
Assistant Professor at Western University, Warren Steele will present academic mediation on the apparent (non) meaning within many of Warhol’s works. Key works from Warhol’s body of work will be discussed in detail.

With a PhD in English Literature from the University of Glasgow, Steele works principally on relations between literature and technology in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Presently Steele teaches courses at Western University on a variety of subjects, including a second year required course, MIT 2500: The Meaning of Technology, and three third year electives: MIT 3218: Technology, Democracy, and Postwar America; MIT 3224: Crash Landscape; and MIT 3935: Race, Ethnicity and Technology. Beyond this, Steele’s research interests include: the philosophy of technology (Heidegger, specifically); technics and responsibility; the politics of love, memory, mourning, and melancholia; film; critical race theory; critical whiteness studies; Marxist political economy; and media theory.

*Andy Warhol: Revisited is only open to Lecture Event Series ticket holders during these dates and times, and will be closed to general admission entrance.

Andy Warhol Revisited
Located in a 4,200 square foot pop-up gallery space in Toronto, Andy Warhol: Revisited will rotate more than 120 historic Warhol pieces throughout the exhibit’s six-month run including portraits of Marilyn Monroe, Michael Jackson, Mao, Mickey Mouse, Queen Elizabeth, the Dollar Sign Canvas, and the Campbell’s Soup Cans, along with a rare series of prints of John Gotti commissioned by the New York Times.

Open Tuesdays through Sundays from 10am to 8pm until December 31, 2015, admission to Andy Warhol Revisited is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors (65+), $5 for students (full-time with ID) and youth (6 to 17), and kids (under 5) are free. VIP passes for $30 gives visitors’ unlimited access to the exhibit throughout its duration. www.warholrevisited.com. 

St. Joseph Communications, Media Group's FASHION Magazine, Men's FASHION and Toronto Life are proud partners of Andy Warhol: Revisited.

Twitter:  @RevolverGallery, #WarholTO
Instagram:  @RevolverGallery, #WarholTO
Facebook:  /RevolverBeverlyHills, #WarholTO
Website:  www.warholrevisited.com

Celebrating 20 Years of Elevated Canadian Cuisine in Toronto at Canoe Twenty

From a media release:

Celebrate twenty years of elevated
Canadian cuisine with Canoe Twenty

Check out the Canoe Twenty Tasting Menu

TORONTO - Over the past two decades, Oliver & Bonacini’s Canoe has become a landmark Toronto restaurant and a growing part of the international culinary conversation, as it continues to define Canadian cuisine. To mark its 20th anniversary, Canoe invites the public to celebrate this special milestone with Canoe Twenty, a tasting menu that showcases present-day Canoe – a moment in time after its twenty-year evolution.

Canoe’s culinary works of art. Images by Cindy La.

This limited-time experience will be presented by Canoe’s next generation: executive chef John Horne and chef de cuisine Coulson Armstrong, joined by chef Anthony Walsh, who has led Canoe’s culinary brigade since the restaurant opened in 1995. The multi-course commemorative menu will be offered from Sept. 21 (the exact date in 1995 when Canoe opened its doors) until Nov. 20, 2015, and is available with wine pairings ($150) or without ($100).


About Canoe
Since opening in September 1995, Canoe has been recognized among Canada’s top restaurants. Its unique location high atop the TD Bank Tower affords a breathtaking view of downtown Toronto. Originally designed by award-winning design firm Yabu Pushelberg, the restaurant’s space is clean and simple - a brilliant reflection of Canada’s rich, raw environment. That same brilliance is captured through the flavours and textures of Canoe’s inspired Canadian menu, crafted by executive chef John Horne and chef de cuisine Coulson Armstrong. The menu showcases the freshest and finest Canadian fish, game and produce, as well as an outstanding selection of Canadian vintages. Canoe has received numerous awards and distinctions, including a #1 ranking by the Zagat Survey and Toronto Life magazine, as well as a four-star rating by The Globe and Mail (2015). From left: Anthony Walsh, John Horne, Michael Bonacini, and Coulson Armstrong. Image by Allison Woo.

Website:   www.canoerestaurant.com
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/CanoeToronto
Twitter:   @OliverBonacini
Instagram:  @OliverBonacini
Hashtag:    #CanoeTwenty

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Photography with a Purpose: HIPA Presents 'A Dream of Humanity' in Paris July 26 to October 15 2015

From a media release:

HIPA PRESENTS ‘A DREAM OF HUMANITY’ EXHIBITION IN PARIS
July 26 to October 15, 2015
on the Left Bank of the River Seine

PARIS - The Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum International Photography Award (HIPA) is launched an exhibition titled ‘A Dream of Humanity’ on the banks of the River Seine in the French capital, Paris. The exhibition includes photography by world-renowned photojournalist Reza Deghati as well as photographs from the ‘Faces’ initiative by HIPA which involved photography of and by Syrian children in a refugee camp in Northern Jordan. The exhibition is set to run from the 26th of July until the 15th of October 2015, on the banks of the River Seine.

Commenting on the launch of the exhibition, the Secretary General of HIPA, His Excellency Ali bin Thalith said “HIPA undertook the sponsorship of the ‘A Dream of Humanity’ exhibition to be part of our wide-ranging humanitarian responsibility and to document the living conditions of global refugees and their everyday struggles. We also feel that it is our moral obligation to raise awareness of the current plight of Syrian refugees and their bravery in telling us their stories by staring into the lens of a camera”.

Bin Thalith continued that “HIPA is a photography competition which is not restricted by the artform but rather empowered through it to change the lives of as many people as possible. This can be done by repeatedly documenting the hardships faced by global refugees, and what better photographer to do this with than Mr. Reza Deghati, who is a global ambassador for photography and the humanitarian aspect of it. Reza’s photography has changed the lives of many people around the world and we hope to impact more people in the coming period through our joint project, ‘A Dream of Humanity’.


Sunday, July 26, 2015

Emerging Music Festival August 21, 2015 5-10pm - Bryant Park stage & Lawn, New York City


From a media release:

Emerging Music Festival
August 21, 2015
5-10pm - Bryant Park stage & Lawn, New York City

Five up-and-coming local bands, food, beer and wine, and lawn games make for a perfect evening.

Bryant Park will be the place to be for music lovers on Friday, August 21 as we present our first-ever Emerging Music Festival on the Bryant Park Stage and Lawn. This promises to be a wonderful summer evening, with great music, delicious food, beer and wine, and lawn activities.

The Emerging Music Festival presents an eclectic array of five rising bands performing soul, indie rock, dream pop, and more. The groups have all been covered on major music outlets, and have entertained audiences at venues throughout the city.

The talented lineup includes:
• Julia Easterlin, a vocalist using loop technology and her one-of-a-kind voice to create music that draws freely from jazz, pop, West African dance, and soul. You may have seen her at Lollapalooza and SXSW.
• Lazyeyes, a three-piece from Brooklyn formed by guitarist and vocalist Jason Abrishami (The Twees), Paul Volpe (Triple Cobra) on bass, and Jeremy Sampson (Eastern Hollows) on drums. Stereogum described the band’s sound as "a muscular, riff-happy brand of guitar-based dream-pop," going on to proclaim, "songs burst with angular hooks and polished melodies."
• Mad Satta, an ultra-tight eight-pie ce outfit that “waves the flag for future-soul, mixing old-school vibes with jazz and modern-day funk" (VIBE). The group is held down by edgy bass lines, a sophisticated mix of guitar, organ, drums and horns, as well as smoky powerful vocals.
• Miracles of Modern Science, a group with a vision for the future of pop music. With violin, cello, mandolin, drums, and a double bass-wielding frontman, MOMS creates “pop that sounds like something new” (Wired). Presented in association with Subculture.
• Plus one more act to be announced.

In the spirit of all successful music festivals, a selection of the city’s finest food vendors will be on hand to offer delicious food, beer, and wine. There will also be a selection of fun, warm-weather activities to participate in, including juggling lessons, hula hooping, tether ball, and photo ops.
 
The Emerging Music Festival runs from 5pm-10pm on Friday, August 21. Music will be performed on the Bryant Park Stage at the western edge of the Lawn. Blankets and picnics are encouraged but please, no plastic tarps. Though food and beverages will be available for sale, everyone is welcome to bring their own.

Emerging Music Festival is free and open to all ages. No tickets are required. Outside food and drink are welcome. Must be 21+ to purchase beer and wine.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

The Wiz: A Celebration in Dance & Music -- August 12 to 14 2015 FREE in New York City

From a media release:

The Wiz: A Celebration in Dance & Music
featuring 
PHYLICIA RASHAD, ANDRE DE SHIELDS, DEE DEE BRIDGE WATER, EBONY JO-ANN, INAYA DAY and more 

Central Park, Manhattan
SummerStage
Wednesday, August 12, 2015
Doors at 7pm - FREE

Marcus Garvey Park
W. 122nd & Mt. Morris Park
August 13 & 14, 2015
Doors at 6pm - FREE

The Wiz: A Celebration in Dance and Music: Choreographer Website

NEW YORK CITY - This performance, choreographed by the Tony Award-winner George Faison with musical direction by Damien L. Sneed, will feature co-host / emcee Tony Award-winner (and Munchkin from the original Broadway run!) Phylicia Rashad; André De Shields (reprising his role as The Wiz); Tony Award-Winner for the role of Glinda, Dee Dee Bridgewater; Ebony Jo-Ann in the role of Addaperle; singer/songwriter Wallace Gary as The Scarecrow; Inaya Day as Dorothy plus more TBA.

George Faison, internationally celebrated producer, writer, composer, director, choreographer and dancer, made history in 1975 when he became the first African American to win a Tony Award for Best Choreography for The Wiz. In honor of the Broadway hit's 40th anniversary this year, Faison will present performances of original songs and dances from the show. Mr. Faison also heads the Faison Firehouse Theater in Central Harlem, which he founded in 2000 along with Tad Schnugg.The Firehouse is a technologically advanced theater where Mr. Faison develops digital applications for the performing arts as well as original theater pieces. The 130-seat theater, branded "Hollywood of Harlem" by the media, is a full service performing arts and cultural center with fine arts galleries, rehearsal facilities and a cabaret theater.

• For complete series lineup, please visit SummerStage.org
• Enjoy the benefits of SummerStage Membership: click here to join.

PLEASE NOTE:  SummerStage shows take place outdoors and take place RAIN OR SHINE. Shows are only cancelled in the event of what event organizers consider to be dangerous winds or lightning. Schedule of events and performers is subject to change. The following cannot be brought into the Central Park venue: glass bottles, cans, coolers, folding chairs, bikes, rollerblades, skateboards, beach umbrellas, video cameras, selfie sticks, professional camera gear, tripods or pets. SummerStage is not responsible for prohibited items left outside the venue. Bags subject to search. Alcoholic beverages are forbidden in NYC Parks. The distribution and sale of unauthorized promotional materials is banned. Beer and wine are on sale at the Central Park venue for onsite consumption only.  Smoking is prohibited in all NYC parks.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

CD Release: Ballaké Sissoko and Vincent Segal Deepen the Conversation on Musique de Nuit (Six Degrees Records - September 4, 2015)

From a media release:

CD Release:
Midnight Music and Rooftop Freedom: Ballaké Sissoko and Vincent Segal Deepen the Conversation on Musique de Nuit
(Six Degrees Records - September 4, 2015)

• Keep an eye out for it on Six Degrees Records
Like them on FB for Touring Updates
• Pre-order from Amazon in the UK

French cellist Vincent Segal and Malian kora virtuoso Ballaké Sissoko sat down together, in the wonderful, peculiar hours when all life seemed suspended. And they played together, in quiet dialogue. At night, they felt liberated.

“Night is a special time in Mali,” Segal explains. “It’s a little less hot, and everyone’s asleep apart from the night owls like us. The city’s not as noisy, music mixes with rumor, and there’s something redeeming about simply sitting outside and playing. That’s what we tried to capture here, that freedom the night can bring.”



They channel it via the cello and the kora, the sparkling sound of the heart and the thoughtfulness of the soul, evoking night’s mysterious, exquisite span on Musique de Nuit (Six Degrees Records; release: September 4, 2015), the successor to their rapturously acclaimed first album together, Chamber Music. And it’s a very aptly-titled disc.

Six years have passed since the pair recorded Chamber Music over three days in Bamako, Mali. In that time the world has changed beyond measure. Sissoko’s homeland came under siege from fundamentalist troops for many months, while in Paris the Charlie Hebdo killings proved that violence can spring up anywhere. And that sense of tension, of change flows through Musique de Nuit.

“What all that gave us was the thirst to play, to sit up there on the roof and explore all the feelings that came out,” Segal says. “We’d never stopped playing together after that first album, and we’ve done plenty of concerts and tours. We know each other well now and we can be free. The music’s less serene than Chamber Music, but so is the world.”

Recorded outside, the ambient noises of Bamako—the call of a bird or the voices just at the edge of hearing—are very much a part of the disc. They bring a sense of intimacy and closeness, of listening in on a private dialogue. “The darkness is very conducive to conversations,” Segal agrees. “It’s right for interactions that aren’t arranged, that just ebb and flow. And that’s what this does. There were no overdubs. What you hear is what the two of us played.”

There are indeed no outside musicians on the record beyond the timeless voice of Babani Koné on “Diabaro.” The simplicity blossoms into subtle richness. Every other sound comes from the kora or the cello, even though other instruments seem to peer in and add color and shade. “We wanted to evoke the sound of phantom instruments,” Segal laughs. “So we made the kora and cello sound like a flute, a ngoni, a takamba. But everything there is us.”

Both musicians bring years of experience to their work together. Segal trained as a classical cellist but he’s worked with artists as diverse as Elvis Costello, Cesaria Evora, and Brazil’s Carlinhos Brown, as well as being an ongoing member of downtempo electronica group Bumcello. Born into a griot family, Sissoko was destined for music from birth. After studying the tradition, he played in a duo with Toumani Diabaté before expanding his horizons to record and perform with musicians from all over the globe, becoming a regular part of the cast used by Italian composer Ludovico Einaudi.

Every note on Musique du Nuit comes from what they’ve both learned, and what they continue to learn, as two artists interacting. “This isn’t Africa meets the West,” Segal insists. “What ‘West’ would we be talking about, anyway? Since my teens I’ve played with musicians from all over, and Ballaké has performed with people from China, Iran, America, and more. Like everyone else, our influences come from all over. Artists have always soaked up what they hear and brought it out in their music, and we’re no different. Music isn’t something from one nation, even when we think it is. Think of the Bach Cello Suites; they have French minuets and gavottes, as well as English jigs. There’s no need for national ownership of music. There is simply the freedom to have fun.”

There’s absolute delight in the playing, the entire spectrum of the night in the music, from the joy and hope that arrives with nightfall through to the quiet, introspective hours before dawn. “Samba Tomora” is a gleeful, graceful dance, while “Balazando” takes the duo into wilder territory that draws on modern jazz and the moods of electronica in parts before the breathless delicacy of the title track brings a soft, thoughtful close to the disc.

It’s music built on empathy, the bond that’s built from hours and months of playing together. Perhaps even more, it’s founded on the trust of being able to push each other, to listen as much as play. “Chamber Music is where it started,” Segal agrees. “But all we’ve done together since then has reinforced our collaboration. And this is where we are now, the two of us together.”

From their last collaboration, 2011's "Chamber Music":